Honors Courses – Fall

ANTHR 215 H
GEN ED Social Science credit: Magic, Myth, and Ritual Honors
3 credits
This course presents a cross-cultural study of various beliefs surrounding the supernatural world and associated rituals in various societies of Africa, Asia, Oceania, South America, native North America and elsewhere.  The emphasis of the course is on understanding beliefs and rituals within their social contexts and on broad comparison to derive insight into the general functions of belief and rituals in human societies.  Using anthropological theory, the course will explore the roles of mythology, ritual specialists, magic, witchcraft, and ritualized behavior to expose students to the variability of ideological belief around the world from the strange to the familiar. Instructor: Prof. Betty Jo Stokes

COMM 109H
GEN ED Communications Credit: Speech Communication Honors
3 credits
This course provides an in-depth exploration of issues and topics in communication. Students will learn techniques and styles of oral communication and utilize these throughout the course to share research in special topics such as listening, intercultural communication, communication between genders, and the power of language to shape our perceptions of the world around us. Students will work in groups as well as individually, and will investigate and experience communication in a variety of contexts. Oral presentations requiring extensive planning and preparation and a research paper are required. 
3 credits; Instructor:  Professor Linda Kalfayan

ECON 101H
GEN ED Social Science credit: Macroeconomics Honors
3 credits
M/TH 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. – Room TBA
This course is designed to introduce students to both the basic principles used in economic theory and to the institutional details of the organization of economic systems in the United States and other countries. In addition, the course helps students understand the ways in which different economies are linked and the effects of economic interactions within and between countries. The contents of the course range from demand and supply analysis to monetary and fiscal policies, with special emphasis on international economic issues. Various contemporary macroeconomic policy issues are also analyzed. The course also develops a conceptual framework to help students independently analyze their issues. Prerequisite: ENG 101; 3 credits; Instructor:  Prof. Farhad Ameen    

ENG 101H
GEN ED English Credit: Writing for College
3 credits
Expository and argumentative writing is the focus of this course. Students read and discuss prose essays which present significant issues and respond to them in scholarly form and language. Research and its proper documentation are included in this process. 
Prerequisite: Score of 9 or 10 on the Writing Entrance Exam; 3 credits; Instructor: Professor Mira Sakrajda

ENG 102H
GEN ED English or Humanities Credit: Writing and Literature
3 credits
Composition and Literature II introduces students to literary genres (short story, poetry, drama, novel). This course will present masterpieces in each of these forms, which students will read, discuss and write about in their journals and in critical essays. Research will be required. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101; 3 credits; Instructor: Professor Richard Rodriguez

ENG 210H
GEN ED Humanities Credit: American Dream
3 credits – Online – 
OFFERED ALTERNATING YEARS ONLY, FALL ONLY
This course examines the American Dream in its many facets and transformations over this nation’s history. Central to these various contested versions of the Dream are different visions of America itself: as a “city on a hill,” bountiful Eden or as forbidding wilderness; as endless frontier, “home town” community, or urban industrial powerhouse; as mecca for immigrants and level playing field, or as exclusionary and oppressive world superpower. Our goal is to identify what the American Dream has meant in the past, and what (if anything) it means today. Prerequisite: ENG 102; 3 credits; Online Course; Instructor:  Professor Jim Werner

ENG 217 H
GEN ED Humanities Credit: Holocaust Studies Honors
3 credits – OFFERED ALTERNATING YEARS ONLY, FALL ONLY
This course studies the Holocaust in particular and racism in general. It examines a number of major questions such as, “How could a ‘cultured’ people, the nation of Beethoven, commit such barbaric crimes?” Special attention is given to the roles of silence, complicity, and personal responsibility. Students complete a three-part project in which they investigate an aspect of the Holocaust. Guest speakers and films complement the material. Class hrs. 3. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102;  3 credits; Instructor: Professor Scott Zaluda

PHIL 201H
GEN ED Humanities Credit: Philosophy of Art
3 Credits
This class focuses on two difficult questions: What is art?  And how can we rationally defend our evaluations of art?  Our efforts in answering these questions will be guided by five philosophical theories of art: imitation, instrumentalism, formalism, expression, and institutional. Many diverse philosophers, artists, and works of art will be addressed and illuminating connections to philosophical accounts of knowledge, morality, self, society, cosmos, and religion will be made.  Along the way we will also investigate the nature of beauty, taste, aesthetic experience, creativity, originality, imagination, inspiration, the sublime, and the horror of the uncanny. Every class will discuss and apply theory to film, music, and painting. — 3 credits; Instructor: Prof. Dwight Goodyear

PHYSC 154H
Physical Science Honors: Life in the Universe Honors
4 credits
– ALTERNATING YEARS, FALL ONLY
This course offers an approach to the science of life beyond Earth, from the viewpoint of various physical sciences. Emphasis is on the physical processes that shape our understanding of life and the habitability of terrestrial planets. Specific topics include: the possibility of life within our solar system, planetary atmospheres and geophysics, the search for extra-solar planets, the feasibility of inter-stellar travel, and the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence. The social and philosophical implications of the course material is discussed. Lab activities include physics and geology investigations, as well as a class field trip. 4 credits; Instructors: Professor Laurel Senft and Professor Paul Robinson

POLSC 112H
Honors Social Science: International Law and Organizations Honors
3 credits
This course is an introduction to international law, exploring the theories behind international law, the concept of the national state and the formation of world organizations in the twentieth century. It covers such topics as human rights, the environment, refugees, terrorism, war crimes and multinational corporations from an historical as well as legal perspective. Emphasis will be placed on international problem solving and the issues of peacekeeping and dispute resolution. The student will learn legal terminology, case analysis and briefing. Prerequisite History/ Political Science.3 credits; Instructor: Professor Anne D’Orazio

PSYCH 101H
GEN ED Behavioral Science Credit: General Psych Honors
3 credits
As a foundation for all behavioral science courses, this course provides the student with an understanding of how psychologists view the world and apply scientific method to the study of behavior. The discipline of psychology is characterized by controversy and change, but has always been committed to objective inquiry to extend our knowledge of the complexity of behavior. Each student designs and carries out a personal research project in order to learn and experience the problems and pitfalls of doing behavioral research. Research methodology, biological foundations of behavior, learning, memory, perception, motivation and personality are topics of study. 
3 credits; Instructor:  Professor Paul Siegel   

 

PSYCH 112H
GEN ED Behavioral Science Credit: Theories of Personality
3 credits
This course will focus on the individual and the various theories that explain both the commonalities and the unique qualities that make up our personalities. The following theoretical perspectives will be presented: Psychoanalytic; Neo-Analytic; Trait; Humanistic; Behaviorist and Social Learning; Biological; and Cognitive. Emphasis is on class discussion and seminar style learning.  3 credits; Instructor: Kamil Hamaoui

Honors Option Courses

In addition to the Honors courses offered each semester, there are “Honors Option” courses.  Faculty members will occasionally arrange with the Honors Program in advance to create an alternative Honors-level syllabus for a non-Honors course.  These courses are designated in the Schedule of Instruction with a descriptor that says “May be taken for Honors credit” or “Honors Option.”  (See list below.)

Students interested in taking such courses for Honors credit must inform the instructor of this intention in the first week of class, and immediately submit an application for the Honors Program (if they have not already done so).  The instructor will inform the Co-Directors, and will generate an Honors Contract for the student to sign, outlining the additional academic responsibilities and assignments to be fulfilled by the student.  A copy of this document should be retained by both the faculty member and the student.  A student may “drop” the Honors Option enrollment (while retaining enrollment in the non-Honors course) up to the end of the Add/Drop period.

The faculty member will alert the Honors Co-Directors, who will confirm the student’s good standing in the Honors Program, and then request the special Honors designation from the Registrar; the student will continue to attend and participate with the non-Honors group.  When the student successfully completes the assignments for the Honors Option and the course overall, the course will be designated as Honors on the student’s transcript.

PLEASE NOTE: No more than two (2) of these Honors Options will be counted toward earning the status of “Honors Program Graduate,” accorded to graduating students who have successfully completed four or more Honors courses.   To be an Honors Program Graduate, the student MUST take at least two “full” Honors courses; the other two courses may be Honors or Honors Options.

*At this time, we do not have individual professors’ names for these courses.  We are working on getting them.

ADN  131       ADN-NURSING 2-HONORS – Possibly Being Reinstituted in Fall 2015

BIOL 115        GENERAL BIOLOGY 1-HONORS

BIOL 117        GENERAL BIOLOGY 2-HONORS

BIOL 236        HUMAN GENETICS-HONORS

BIOL 237        HUMAN GENETICS LAB-HONORS

COMSC 108    NET GUI DEVELPMNT-HONORS

COMSC 201    DATA STRUCTURES-HONORS

ENG  219        FICTION INTO FILM-HONORS

ENG 241         LATIN AMERICAN SHORT STORIES – HONORS

FILM 125       WRITING FOR FILM-HONORS

GLBUS 201     GLOBAL BUSINESS-HONORS

HSERV 201    METHODS-HELP PROC-HONORS

HSERV 208    CASE MANAGEMENT-HONORS

ITAL 201        INTER ITALIAN 1 – HONORS  — AT DISCRETION OF DEPARTMENT CHAIR ONLY

ITAL 202        INTER ITALIAN 2 – HONORS – AT DISCRETION OF DEPARTMENT CHAIR ONLY

LIN 201/ANTHR 201    LINGUISTICS – HONORS

MUSIC 129     MUSIC THEORY 1-HONORS

MUSIC 197     HISTORY OF JAZZ-HONORS

PHYSC 143H  EARTH SCIENCE – HONORS

PNA  107        PNA NURSING II-HONORS — Possibly Being Reinstituted in Fall 2015

PNA  108        PNA NURSING 2 LAB-HONORS — Possibly Being Reinstituted in Fall 2015

PNA  144        PNA NURSNG 2 CLIN-HONORS — Possibly Being Reinstituted in Fall 2015

PNA  201        PNA NURSING III-HONORS  — Possibly Being Reinstituted in Fall 2015

PNA  202        PNA NURSING 3 LAB-HONORS — Possibly Being Reinstituted in Fall 2015

PNA  207        PNA NURSING IV-HONORS  — Possibly Being Reinstituted in Fall 2015

PNA  208        PNA NURSING 4 LAB-HONORS — Possibly Being Reinstituted in Fall 2015

PNA  242        PNA NURSNG 3 CLIN-HONORS — Possibly Being Reinstituted in Fall 2015

PNA  244        PNA NURSNG 4 CLIN-HONORS — Possibly Being Reinstituted in Fall 2015

SPAN 201       INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 1-HONORS – AT DISCRETION OF DEPARTMENT CHAIR ONLY

SPAN 202       INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 2-HONORS – AT DISCRETION OF DEPARTMENT CHAIR ONLY