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Honors Courses – Spring

BIOL 147 H LAB/LECT
Honors Biology: Psychobiology
4 credits – Tuesday 1:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m. and Wednesday, 1:00 – 1:50 p.m. and 2:00 – 3:50 p.m.   – Room TBA

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the role of biology in shaping human behavior. Lecture topics include the anatomy and physiology of the neuroendocrine system, learning and memory, pain and analgesia, homeostatic motivation, emotions, and stress and stress management. Laboratory sessions include explorations of sensory perception, sleep and dreaming, mental illness, biofeedback, sociobiology and chronobiology. A written term project or classroom presentation is required. 4 credits, Instructor: Professor Chad Thompson

ECON 102H
Honors Social Science: Microeconomics
3 credits – Monday and Thursday – 1:00 – 2:15 p.m. – Room TBA

This course is meant for the student who is already familiar with economic analysis (having taken Macroeconomics, for example) and wants a challenging course to help develop his/her analytical skills in economics. The course should appeal to the student who wants to use the power of economic analysis in addressing various policy issues of the day. 3 credits , Instructor: Prof. Farhad Ameen 
ENG 102 H
Honors English: Composition and Literature II
3 credits — Wednesday – 1:00 – 3:50 p.m. – Room TBA

Composition and Literature II introduces students to literary genres (short story, poetry, drama, novel). This course will present masterpieces in each of these forms which students will read, discuss and write about in their journals and in critical essays. Research will be required. 3 credits, Instructor: Prof. Martucci

ENG 126H
Honors English: Readings in Human Rights
3 credits — Tuesday – 1:00 – 3:50 p.m. – Room TBA

This course studies significant literary, historical and other texts related to human rights. Students read works that address essential questions of social justice, individual conscience and human dignity. International in scope and interdisciplinary in approach, this course explores the role of writing in the concept and practice of human rights. Students complement their reading with independent projects and participation in human rights actions. 3 credits, Instructor: Prof. Alan Devenish

ENG 204H
Honors English: Literature of New York
3 credits — Wednesday – 1:00 – 3:50 p.m. – Room TBA

Some people say that New York is so different from the rest of the U.S. that it is like its own separate country.  This course examines how New York is perhaps a truer embodiment of the ideals of America than the rest of what we call the “Heartland” or “Grassroots America.”  Readings will sample texts from a variety of fields and disciplines, including history, poetry, music, film, philosophy, and others. 3 credits, Instructor: Professor Richard Rodriguez

ENG 224H
Honors English: Great Books
3 credits — Thursday – 9:30 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. – Room TBA
This course offers students the opportunity to read and to engage in intensive study and discussion of classic literary texts—works of enduring influence that stand among the sources of our intellectual tradition and have shaped the development of Western culture. Readings may include the works of Homer, Sophocles, Aeschylus, Euripides, Aristophanes, Boccaccio, Chaucer, Dante, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Moliere, Voltaire, Goethe, Shelley, Austen, Flaubert, Dostoevski, Tolstoy, Joyce, Woolf, Hurston, Camus, Ellison, Achebe.Class Hours: 3Prerequisite: ENG 101, 102 Composition and Literature I & II and Honors permission.  3 credits, Instructor: Professor James Werner

FILM 114H
Honors Humanities: World Cinema
3 credits — Monday, Tuesday, Thursday – 1:00 – 1:50 p.m. – Room TBA

This is an honors-level seminar on the movies as an art form and as an international multicultural phenomenon. Students will engage in a focused exploration of the technical and formal elements that make the movies a unique and powerful means of human expression, one that finds its definition in diverse cultural contexts. The course will provide students with a window onto the rich cultural landscape beyond their own, exposing them to cinematic accomplishments that extend beyond the conventional American model and their own experience and introducing them to the national cinemas of Africa, Asia, Europe, Central and South America, India and the Middle East, with their distinctive perspectives, attitudes, values and beliefs. The course will concern itself with culture and its impact on film as a work of art, with culture as shaper of both content and form. Methods include class discussion, oral and written reports, individual and group class presentations, readings, and critical viewing of selected films and videos. 3 credits, Instructor: Prof. John Cuniberti

HIS 107H
Honors Social Science: Topics in Global History
3 credits — Monday – 5:30 – 8:20 p.m. – Room TBA

This course is a survey of global history from earliest times to the present. It will explore themes constant throughout that period to find patterns of development of governmental institutions and economic systems emphasizing the non-western as well as western experience. The rise and decline of major civilizations, the transition from an agrarian to an urban industrial and now post-industrial society and the nature of warfare will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on discovering the historical roots of contemporary conflicts. EVENING COURSE – 3 credits, Instructor: Prof. Anne D’Orazio

INTER 161H
Honors Humanities: Seminar in Ethics
3 credits — Thursdays – 1:00 – 3:50 p.m. – Room TBA

This discussion-based seminar explores, through works of philosophy and literature, the nature and meaning of good and evil. In exploring goodness, we will consider a set of philosophical theories (natural law theory, consequentialism, Kantian ethics, social contract theory, intuitionism, and virtue ethics) and then apply them to a variety of psychological, sociological, political, and theological issues with the help of Plato’s masterpiece The Republic.  We will then turn to a set of theories of evil (demonic, instrumental, idealistic, and thoughtless) and apply them to the same scope of issues with the help of Shakespeare’s masterful rendition of evil incarnate, Richard III. The transition from good to evil in the course will be facilitated by the fact that the argument of The Republic concludes, on the one hand, with Plato’s unforgettable portrait of the tyrant who bears a striking resemblance to King Richard and, on the other hand, with a powerful myth which asserts the reality of free will in relation to evil. We close the semester by contemplating our own place in the battle of good and evil with the help of Camus’ novel The Fall.  Along the way, we will consider excerpts from the writings of the Bible, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, Voltaire, Sade, Goethe, Kierkegaard, Mill, Dostoevsky, Poe, Wiesel, Arendt, Sartre, G.E. Moore, and Heller.  3 credits, Instructor: Prof. Dwight Goodyear

MATH 170H
Honors Mathematics: History of Math
3 credits — Mondays –
10:00 a.m. – 11:50a.m., Wednesday: 10:00 a.m. – 10:50a.m. – Room TBA
A survey of the history of Mathematics from counting through Calculus and a course about thinking mathematically. The Internet is the main reference tool to investigate the contributions of various cultures and individuals. A problem solving approach is used to study the Mathematical contributions of each culture. 3 credits, Instructor: Professor Jodi Cotten

PSYCH 103H
Abnormal Psychology – Monday – 2:00 – 4:50 p.m. – Room TBA
This course focuses on the development of typical emotional and behavioral problems of childhood and adolescence, including autism and Asperger’s disorder, AD/HD, depression, eating disorders, substance abuse, and personality problems. Clinical material is an integral part of the course, including case studies, in-class case presentations, and videos of psychopathology.Class Hours: 3Prerequisite: PSYCH 101 General Psychology. 3 credits, Instructor: Professor Paul Siegel

PHYSC
Physical Science Honors:
Science, Pseudoscience, and Critical Thinking Honors
3 credits – Room TBA

This course is a reading and discussion intensive course that provides the non-science major with the framework to explore how modern scientists develop and examine their ideas.  The course will focus on non-mathematical explorations of critical thinking techniques, scientific methods, pseudoscience and extraordinary claims, peer review, hypothesis testing, the media portrayal of science, and why a scientific theory is not “just a theory.”  3 credits, No lab; Instructors: Professor Paul Robinson and Laurel Senft 

SOC 101H
Honors Behavioral Science: Introduction to Sociology
3 credits – Monday, Tuesday, Thursday – 12:00 – 12:50 p.m. – Room TBA

This Honors course should appeal to students who are curious about the nature of the social world and who want to participate in a challenging academic environment that sharpens their analytical skills. Students will be introduced to the basic principles of sociology and the concept of culture, to important primary texts, and to the challenge of independent research on contemporary issues and problems. 3 credits, Instructor: Prof. Lori Maida

Honors Option Courses

In addition to the Honors courses offered each semester, there are “Honors Option” courses.  Faculty members will occasionally arrange with the Honors Program in advance to create an alternative Honors-level syllabus for a non-Honors course.  These courses are designated in the Schedule of Instruction with a descriptor that says “May be taken for Honors credit” or “Honors Option.”  (See list below.)

Students interested in taking such courses for Honors credit must inform the instructor of this intention in the first week of class, and immediately submit an application for the Honors Program (if they have not already done so).  The instructor will inform the Co-Directors, and will generate an Honors Contract for the student to sign, outlining the additional academic responsibilities and assignments to be fulfilled by the student.  A copy of this document should be retained by both the faculty member and the student.  A student may “drop” the Honors Option enrollment (while retaining enrollment in the non-Honors course) up to the end of the Add/Drop period.

The faculty member will alert the Honors Co-Directors, who will confirm the student’s good standing in the Honors Program, and then request the special Honors designation from the Registrar; the student will continue to attend and participate with the non-Honors group.  When the student successfully completes the assignments for the Honors Option and the course overall, the course will be designated as Honors on the student’s transcript.

PLEASE NOTE: No more than two (2) of these Honors Options will be counted toward earning the status of “Honors Program Graduate,” accorded to graduating students who have successfully completed four or more Honors courses.   To be an Honors Program Graduate, the student MUST take at least two “full” Honors courses; the other two courses may be Honors or Honors Options.

*At this time, we do not have individual professors’ names for these courses.  We are working on getting them.

ACC  204        INTERMED ACCT 2 – HONORS

ADN  131       ADN-NURSING 2-HONORS

ADN  136       ADN NURSING 2 LAB-HONORS

ADN  144       ADN-NURSNG 2 CLIN-HONORS

ADN  221       ADN-NURSING 3-HONORS

ADN  222       ADN-NURSING 3 LAB-HONORS

ADN  242       ADN-NURSNG 3 CLIN-HONORS

BIOL 115        GENERAL BIOLOGY 1-HONORS

BIOL 117        GENERAL BIOLOGY 2-HONORS

BIOL 236        HUMAN GENETICS-HONORS

BIOL 237        HUMAN GENETICS LAB-HONORS

COMSC 108    NET GUI DEVELPMNT-HONORS

COMSC 201    DATA STRUCTURES-HONORS

ENG  219        FICTION INTO FILM-HONORS

FILM 109       AMERICAN CINEMA-HONORS

FILM 125       WRITING FOR FILM-HONORS

HSERV 201    METHODS-HELP PROC-HONORS

HSERV 208    CASE MANAGEMENT-HONORS

ITAL 201        INTER ITALIAN 1 – HONORS

ITAL 202        INTER ITALIAN 2 – HONORS

MUSIC 129     MUSIC THEORY 1-HONORS

MUSIC 197     HISTORY OF JAZZ-HONORS

PNA  107        PNA NURSING II-HONORS

PNA  108        PNA NURSING 2 LAB-HONORS

PNA  144        PNA NURSNG 2 CLIN-HONORS

PNA  201        PNA NURSING III-HONORS

PNA  202        PNA NURSING 3 LAB-HONORS

PNA  207        PNA NURSING IV-HONORS

PNA  208        PNA NURSING 4 LAB-HONORS

PNA  242        PNA NURSNG 3 CLIN-HONORS

PNA  244        PNA NURSNG 4 CLIN-HONORS

RESP 103       RESPIRATORY CARE 2-HONORS

RESP 201       RESPIRATORY CARE 3-HONORS

RESP 203       RESPIRATORY CARE 4-HONORS

SPAN 201       INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 1-HONORS

SPAN 202       INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 2-HONORS